Teaching Methods in Computer Science

CSE 599 is a TA development class for incoming TAs in Computer Science and Engineering classes.

Spring 2023: CSE 1202 (3:30-4:50 PM)

Instructor: Prof. Mai ElSherief (melsherif@ucsd.edu)

Office hours: Friday 4-5 pm (Zoom link) or by appointment


TA: Nazanin Sabri (nsabri@ucsd.edu

Office hours: By Appointment

ANNOUNCEMENT: FIRST DAY MEETING WILL BE WEDNESDAY April 5TH, 2023

Why take CSE 599?


CSE 599 will help you during your first CSE TA experience. In this class, you will learn how to synthesize information and help others learn it. You will meet weekly with other first-time TAs and a mentor to share your experiences and practice key skills. And you will document your learning process by observing teaching and reflecting on your growth.

599 Course Schedule (Spring 2023)

References from the Education Research/Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Literature


Syllabus

What is the workload for CSE 599 and how is it graded?

CSE 599 is a 2-unit course: expect to spend up to 6 hours per week on this course, including the 80-minute weekly session. The additional three-and-a-half or so hours per week will be spent evaluating and refining your TA activities, preparing for CSE 599 practicum sessions, and consulting background research papers, information guides, and videos.

This class is taken S/U. We hope that every student will successfully earn a passing grade in this class. To do so, you need to meet or exceed the following minimum passing thresholds in each course component by Wednesday of Finals week.

Around Week 6 of the quarter, we will have a checkpoint to confirm that you are on track for successfully completing the course requirements. Students who do not pass this checkpoint may not be offered TA appointments for the next quarter.



With the successful completion of this class, you will be able to: 




Acknowledgments

This course and its resources were adapted from versions developed at UC San Diego by Mia Minnes, Dean Tullsen, Beth Simon, Leo Porter, Gary Gillespie, Christine Alvarado, and Niema Moshiri, and by workshop material developed at University of Calgary by Laleh Behjat. Additional reference material was shared by Stanley Lo, Jim Cooke, and the Teaching + Learning Commons